20 years of Treasure
3 May 2017

We’re celebrating two decades of the Portable Antiquities Scheme – the organisation recording archaeological finds in England and Wales – with our new Treasure 20 campaign. Treasure Registrar Ian Richardson introduces the project and outlines how you can vote for your favourite dazzling discovery from the last 20 years!

The day the mastodons left
18 April 2017

Museum Archivist Francesca Hillier explains how the collection got too big for one institution, and why you won’t find dinosaurs in Bloomsbury.

In search of a lost city… and a lost explorer
24 March 2017

Inspiration for Indiana Jones? No, not our curator Jago Cooper, but Colonel Percy Fawcett, whose incredible true story is now told through a new film, The Lost City of Z. Curators Jago Cooper and Kate Jarvis take a look at some of the objects associated with his expeditions to the Amazon.

Giving a voice to ancient Egyptian poetry
15 March 2017

How do you capture the ancient resonances of phrases that mean nothing to modern audiences? How do you invest them with meaning and emotion without a set of explanatory footnotes that kill all spontaneity? Oxford University professor Richard Bruce Parkinson worked with actress and writer Barbara Ewing to record a dramatic reading of one of the finest works of Egyptian poetry The Tale of Sinuhe. 

Women of the world
8 March 2017

Did you know that the word ‘museum’ literally means a temple to the muses, all of whom were female (albeit allegorical)? This International Women’s Day, take a look at some of the very real women represented in the Museum’s collection today. Your guides are some of the many women curators who are continuing to tell these important stories to the world.

World Book Day: leafing through the pages of history
2 March 2017

For World Book Day, we’re celebrating all things literary. From some of the earliest writing from 5,000 years ago to our favourite fiction, discover the different ways people around the world have shared ideas through books in their many forms!

A history of love (and lust and sex) in 14 objects: a Valentine’s Day special
14 February 2017

The Beatles sang ‘All you need is love’. Curator Lloyd de Beer isn’t convinced. There’s also room for lust and sex, apparently…

Joining the Hirayama Studio
31 January 2017

Kyoko Kusunoki joined the Hirayama Studio last year as Conservator of Japanese Paintings. In this blog Kyoko discusses some of the projects she has been working on, including preparing for the exhibition Hokusai: beyond the Great Wave.

Everything you need to know about Chinese New Year
28 January 2017

Happy Chinese New Year 2017! Today millions of people across the world are preparing to gather with family, get out the firecrackers and celebrate the Spring Festival. Here’s a handy guide to the most anticipated event in the Chinese calendar – from the origins of the Chinese zodiac to the traditions and the superstitions surrounding the celebrations. May the Year of the Rooster be prosperous and happy for you – Gong Xi Fa Cai!

Chinese scroll mounting at Chinese New Year
26 January 2017

As the year of the rooster approaches, the Chinese scroll mounters in the Hirayama Studio have plenty to crow about…

29 things you (probably) didn’t know about the British Museum
14 January 2017

You may think you know the British Museum, but there’s always more to discover. Here, we highlight a few secrets to delight and surprise even the most enthusiastic Museum fan. Never afraid to jump on a bandwagon, we’ve compiled a handy listicle of some of the weird and wonderful facts that make the British Museum unique. Maybe you knew it all already? If you did, you probably work here already…

Welcome to the new British Museum blog
13 January 2017

Chris Michaels, Head of Digital and Publishing, introduces our refreshed British Museum blog, and discusses the role of the blog as part of our digital strategy.

The Suicide Exhibition
23 August 2016

Nick Harris, Digital Creative Producer chats with Curator of Modern Money, Tom Hockenhull, and Museum Historian, Marjorie Caygill, about how the Museum dealt with the threat from German bombers during the Blitz. 

The mystery of the Fetter Lane hoard
27 August 2015

Amelia Dowler discusses the mystery of the Fetter Lane hoard, and how coins minted in Alexandria, Egypt between AD 58 and AD 284 ended up in Roman Britannia. 

Bringing a Ming painting back to life
8 December 2014

Carole Weiss and Jin Xian Qiu reveal the work that took place behind the scenes in the Hirayama Studio to prepare a Ming dynasty silk painting by artist Zhu Bang to go on display. 

Loan of a Parthenon sculpture to the Hermitage
5 December 2014

To celebrate the 250th anniversary of the State Hermitage Museum in St Petersburg, the British Museum loaned the sculpture of the river-god Ilissos from the West pediment of the Parthenon.  Neil MacGregor, Director of The British Museum shares some of the history of the long standing friendship between the first great museums of the European Enlightenment. 

3D-imaging the Assyrian reliefs at the British Museum: from the 1850s to today
19 November 2014

Computer 3D technology is being increasingly adopted in museums to aid with conservation, curatorial research and interpretation. Here Matthew Cock explains how scans of the British Museum’s collection of Assyrian reliefs take by a team CyArk provide a fantastic resource that we can use to help people better understand and engage with these objects.

Barlach’s hovering angel travels to London
6 November 2014

Clarissa von Spee explains the significance of German expressionist sculptor Ernst Barlach’s most important work, Der Schwebende (The Hovering),  and how the work managed to survive the First World War. On display as part of the exhibition Germany: memories of a nation, 16 October 2014 to 25 January 2015.   

Colourful glass adornments from Egypt: an 18th-dynasty enigma
31 July 2014

Colourful beads for collars and wigs or earrings? Anna Hodgkinson has been updating over 200 of the Collections online record of items of glass jewellery from the New Kingdom in the Department of Ancient Egypt and Sudan.

Tattoos in ancient Egypt and Sudan
26 June 2014

Due to the nature of human remains from ancient Egypt and Nubia, evidence for tattooing is scarce. However in the Ancient lives, new discoveries exhibition, one of the mummies on display is so well preserved the British Museum has located a tattoo and other marks on her skin. Marie Vandenbeusch discusses the significance of this discovery. 

A new look at ancient Egyptian textiles
2 June 2014

Amandine Mérat and Emily Taylor have been working on reordering the Museum’s Egyptian textiles collection not by provenance or date but by technique. By conducting a close visual examination of technique, and drawing on knowledge of their cultural background, they hope to determine the possible original function of many of the textiles.

The lives of others in runic inscriptions
4 April 2014

Martin Findell is a Research Associate at the University of Leicester. He is particularly interested in the problems of understanding the relationship between spelling and sound change in the early Germanic languages, and in the uses and abuses of runes in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. In this blog Martin discusses some of the runic writing on display in Vikings: life and legend.

The earliest human footprints outside Africa
7 February 2014

In May 2013 a team of scientists led by the British Museum, Natural History Museum and Queen Mary University of London discovered a series of footprints left by early humans in ancient estuary mud over 800,000 years ago at Happisburgh, Norfolk. Nicholas Ashton, Curator of Palaeolithic and Mesolithic collections at the British Museum has been working on the Happisburgh Palaeolithic excavations.

From Parthian chicken to flat breads: experimenting with a Roman oven
30 July 2013

In the next blog by Sally Grainger, chef and author of The Classical Cookbook, Sally experiments with cooking in replica of a clibanus oven.

New discoveries of cave art in the Caribbean
9 July 2013

Jago Cooper has just returned from an exploratory research visit to the uninhabited national park on the island of Mona in Puerto Rico. In this blog, Jago details his findings which were rather unexpected. 

Virtual autopsy: discover how the ancient Egyptian Gebelein Man died
16 November 2012

This year, British Museum curators have collaborated with scientists and medical experts to perform a CT scan of a naturally-preserved mummy know as the Gebelein Man. Detailed images created from the scans’ high resolution X-rays allow us to look inside his body and learn about his life – and death – in ways never before possible. Daniel Antoine tells us what we have been able to discover about the Gebelein Man.

Finishing a 3D, 2,000 year-old Roman jigsaw puzzle: the Hallaton helmet unveiled
10 January 2012

The Hallaton helmet was shown in public today for the first time since it was buried 2,000 years ago. JD Hill reveals to us the significance of this discovery and the work behind the scenes that has led up to its display.

A conservator says goodbye to China
5 January 2012

Valentina Marabini has just returned from a year in China, spent studying with the conservators at the Shanghai Museum

What is the role and value of crafts today?
17 August 2011

With Grayson Perry: The Tomb of the Unknown Craftsman opening in two months, the British Museum has asked contributors from the craft world to share their thoughts on the importance of craft today. First up is Teleri Lloyd-Jones is Assistant Editor of Crafts Magazine. Crafts is an editorially independent bi-monthly magazine published by the Crafts Council, the national development agency for contemporary craft in the UK.